mental illness Archives - Page 8 of 8 - Unhinged

Unhinged Episode #014: Texting Truths and Brain Facts

by Ed 1 Comment
Unhinged Episode #014: Texting Truths and Brain Facts

Another month’s end, another situational downward turn. In our 14th episode, we discuss how living under the poverty line puts any mental illness recovery in danger. Doug’s situation is no exception as he struggles to survive for eight days with a zero balance. We re-enact a texting conversation we had in preparation for the show that outlines just how negative, sarcastic, and angry one can get when control over normal, mundane things is lost.

On the lighter side, we present another round of interesting facts about the brain.

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Unhinged Episode #013: Letters From the Loony Bin

by Ed 0 Comments
Unhinged Episode #013: Letters From the Loony Bin

In our 13th episode, we cover Doug’s 6-month stint in a mental hospital. We learn what it felt like for him to be in a real life “One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest”. Doug reads an old journal entry, which sounds like a dark and emotional suicide note. He’s come a long way since then.

Next, we discuss mental health advocacy. This has become the mission for this podcast, as well as Doug’s special purpose. We follow this with a words from some of our fans out in the wild, as well as a segment listing some interesting facts about the brain.

Finally, we touch on the dynamics of Father’s Day and how it differs between us.

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Unhinged Episode #012: Psychopharmacology and Pharmacogenetics

by Ed 0 Comments
Unhinged Episode #012: Psychopharmacology and Pharmacogenetics

This week we talk about drugs and how genetics might play a part in how they affect different people. Doug , as part of an IMPACT study in pharmacogenetics, discovers he metabolizes slowly, so medicinal treatments need to be adjusted accordingly. We also discuss his battles with the Ministry of Health and drugs not covered by the Ontario Health Insurance Plan (OHIP).

Ed takes the Hamilton Depression Scale test (HAM-D) to measure his depression level. How does the supposedly “normal” half of the Unhinged team rate? Doug also covers helpful tools for depressive disorder, including diet, positive self-talk, journaling, and more.

And finally, we get a progress report on Doug’s current state. What did he score on the HAM-D test?

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Unhinged Episode #011: Inside the Criminal Mind

by Ed 0 Comments
Unhinged Episode #011: Inside the Criminal Mind

We all love to fear monsters. In Hollywood, that thrill brings in millions. But what about when those monsters are real people who feel no remorse for their criminal behaviors, including murder? In this episode of Unhinged, we dig into what makes serial killers, from environmental factors to neurology. Can a serial killer be created in childhood? Can they be rehabilitated?

We also talk about the similarities and differences between sociopaths and psychopaths. There’s a fine line between the two, but there is a critical difference. You’ll also learn a bit about what drove people like Ted Bundy, Edward Gein, Joel Rifkin, and Charles Manson.
The scariest part of the show is seeing how Doug had a similar childhood experience to one of the above serial killers, yet he has not turned out the same way. We discuss why that may be.

And lastly, we talk about why we like watching movies about killers, disasters, and horror. Do we each go into it in the same frame of mind?

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Unhinged Episode #006: Celebrities, Ketamine, and Family

by Ed 0 Comments
Unhinged Episode #006: Celebrities, Ketamine, and Family

We start by listing some celebrities known to have Major Depressive Disorder. Though their fame does bring much needed focus to mental illness, we strive for the day when it’s accepted as a disease that is out of the control of its victims. We also discuss the use of ketamine in the fight against treatment-resistant depression. Doug participated in ketamine trials and walks us through its dissociative effects and how it brings relief to some.

Lastly, we talk about the importance of family as a support system, and how TRD can tear families apart when their support is needed the most. Our podcast has started a conversation between Doug and some members of his family. The hope for reconciliation is there.

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What Unhinged Means to Me

by Ed 0 Comments

Howdy, folks. This is Ed, co-founder and technical producer of the Unhinged Podcast. I’m what some call the “normal” half of the Unhinged team, meaning I do not suffer from any mental health issues myself. However, being friends with Doug has given me quite a bit of experience dealing with mental illness and the effect it has on everyone that comes near it.

Many people may ask why I would get involved in such a serious topic when I could have easily started a site on something like guitar, photography, usability, or any of the other geeky interests I have. The answer is both simple and complex at the same time. Let me explain…

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Unhinged Episode #001: Introduction

by Ed 3 Comments
Unhinged Episode #001: Introduction

Welcome to Unhinged! This is our very first podcast, where we discuss who we are and what we will be talking about in this series. We introduce Doug, who has been suffering from treatment resistant depression for most of his life, and me (Ed), an old college buddy who leads what most would consider a “normal” life. In this episode, we touch on early childhood triggers and phobias and the differences between how I handled things versus Doug, and how our two roads diverged over the years.

Nature vs. Nurture is another topic discussed, as much of Doug’s issues were found to be neurological, yet the stigma of mental illness kept many people at a distance.

 

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